scarification

[ skar-uh-fi-key-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF scarification
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCARIFICATION

Scarification, with other crude penances, has now been superseded by benefaction.

I concluded that the scars were due to the practice of scarification.

The faces of both sexes were much disfigured as a result of their religious beliefs, which led to the practice of scarification.

He frequently pretends to suck out such an object by the application of the lips alone, without any scarification whatever.

Scarification to give vent to pent-up blood or puncture to allow the escape of effused serum will afford prompt relief.

Indeed, chipped or flaked flints, now replaced by broken glass, were formerly used for shaving and scarification.

A sharp flint serves them as a lancet for letting blood, as well as for scarification in bruises and swellings.

When the moss sickens of the perpetual potato, its rebellion is punished by scarification.

Scarification simply for purposes of ornamentation is not practiced to any great extent by the Negritos around Pinatubo.

Scarification of the affected part is a common mode of treating local inflammatory complaints.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1400, "act of covering with scratches or slight cuts," from Old French scarification (14c.), from Late Latin scarificationem (nominative scarificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of scarificare, from Latin scarifare "scratch open," from Greek skariphasthai "to scratch an outline, sketch," from skariphos "pencil, stylus," from PIE root *skribh- "to cut, separate, sift" (see script (n.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCARIFICATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.