romancer

[ noun, adjective roh-mans, roh-mans; verb roh-mans ]SEE DEFINITION OF romancer
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ROMANCER

Hawthorne—it has been pointed out a hundred times—is the Puritan romancer.

“One must in justice admit that there is some provocation,” continued the romancer.

He is distinguished alike as a critic, a poet, and a romancer.

It must not be forgotten that Theydon was a romancer, an idealist.

The bishop's name would have slept with his fathers, the romancer is remembered.

The romancer has an incontestable advantage over the historian.

And though the story is true, yet it took a romancer to do it.

There is room, he said, for the romancer in these matters; but for the humourist, none.

Mickey Vickins is a romancer, declared one of the highbrows.

This is either an inspiration of a romancer's imagination or a study.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "chronicler writing in French," from Old French romanceour, from romanz (see romance (n.)). Later, "one inclined to romantic imagination" (the main sense 19c.); modern use for "seducer, wooer" of a romantic quality appears to be a new formation c.1967 from romance (v.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ROMANCER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.