Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REMEMBRANCE

You were our only child; named Artaminta, in remembrance of my mother.

When you return, you will find a trifling token of remembrance for yourself and Philothea.

The mighty man of Kittery has a double claim to remembrance.

Old people have a remembrance of a foot of snow which lasted for a week.

He spoke of his mother, he really threatened his father by the remembrance of the dead.

That cottage was drawn with an exactness that proved how fresh it was in her remembrance.

I never will revive the remembrance of what is now so painful to me.

I'll not ask you, with your remembrance of my house and all belonging to it, whether you believe it.

Mr Meagles called only one remembrance to his aid, that really did him good.

The remembrance of my young beloved one gave me courage again.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "a memory, recollection," from Old French remembrance (11c.), from remembrer (see remember). From late 14c. as "consideration, reflection; present consciousness of a past event; store of personal experiences available to recollection, capacity to recall the past." Also late 14c. as "memento, keepsake, souvenir," and "a commemoration, remembering, ritual of commemoration." Meaning "faculty of memory, capability of remembering" is early 15c.

British Remembrance Day, the Sunday nearest Nov. 11 (originally in memory of the dead of World War I) is attested from 1921. A remembrancer (early 15c.) was a royal official of the Exchequer tasked with recording and collecting debts due to the Crown; hence also, figuratively "Death" (late 15c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REMEMBRANCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.