refugee

[ ref-yoo-jee, ref-yoo-jee ]SEE DEFINITION OF refugee

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REFUGEE

Some said his father was a Russian refugee, his mother a Mongol woman.

He had no wish to provoke a conflict, but he had no thought of surrendering the refugee.

His father was a refugee from France, and desired to let a part of his house.

Never mind, I'll pay you as much as a refugee—within reason.

Mr. Grindrod and I engaged in reading together "The Refugee."

An exile in London—“a refugee,” as it is termed—he scarce knew what to do.

There was comfort in this—the others must also wait, and the refugee could not go far.

He was a refugee, after all, and only too anxious to go into hiding for a few weeks.

"Nothing at all—a refugee is not supposed to have belongings," replied his wife.

It was communicated to him by M. de Vgobre, a French refugee.

WORD ORIGIN

1680s, from French refugié, noun use of past participle of refugier "to take shelter, protect," from Old French refuge (see refuge). First applied to French Huguenots who migrated after the revocation (1685) of the Edict of Nantes. The word meant "one seeking asylum," till 1914, when it evolved to mean "one fleeing home" (first applied in this sense to civilians in Flanders heading west to escape fighting in World War I). In Australian slang from World War II, reffo.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REFUGEE

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