Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RABBIT

I looked and saw a huge gray squirrel with a tail like a rabbit.

A Welsh rabbit, in the speech of the humorless, who point out that it is not a rabbit.

Put the pieces of rabbit on a hot dish, and pour the gravy over them.

He clavers them over with flattery as the snake clavers the rabbit.

Then she became aware that she no longer had the rabbit warren to herself.

"Some of our boys attacked by a rabbit," I suggested, but still hearkened.

His teeth closed upon the rabbit, and he bore it back to earth with him.

I will tell my rabbit not to make any noise—and to be as white as he can.

Now I think of it, my little sister has one, but she calls it a rabbit, I believe.

That explains why they cover their window up when they have a rabbit to eat.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "young of the coney," from French dialect (cf. Walloon robète), diminutive of Flemish or Middle Dutch robbe "rabbit," of unknown origin. "A Germanic noun with a French suffix" [Liberman]. The adult was a coney (q.v.) until 18c.

Rabbit punch "chop on the back of the neck" so called from resemblance to a gamekeeper's method of dispatching an injured rabbit. Pulling rabbits from a hat as a conjurer's trick recorded by 1843. Rabbit's foot "good luck charm" first attested 1879, in U.S. Southern black culture. Earlier references are to its use as a tool to apply cosmetic powders.

Rabbit ears "dipole television antenna" is from 1950. Grose's 1788 "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue" has "RABBIT CATCHER. A midwife."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RABBIT

coward

nounperson who is scared, easily intimidated
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.