primogeniture

[ prahy-muh-jen-i-cher, -choo r ]SEE DEFINITION OF primogeniture
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRIMOGENITURE

We need not hesitate to attribute the change to the influence of Primogeniture.

Here then emerges the historical difficulty of Primogeniture.

Socially it appears far more just and reasonable than the custom of primogeniture.

Then occurred an extraordinary hitch in the history of primogeniture.

Yet in the case of primogeniture our opinion would have to be modified.

Was then a right of primogeniture to be admitted in the church, as in noble families?

Curiously enough, the Mangaians seem to be sticklers for primogeniture.

I look at society as it is, not as it would be if we had primogeniture and a landed aristocracy.

It is owing to primogeniture that while there is a nobility in England there is no noblesse.

For Aaron was not by primogeniture head of the tribe of Levi.

WORD ORIGIN

"right of succession of the first-born," c.1600, from French primogeniture and directly from Medieval Latin primogenitura, from Late Latin primogenitus "first-born," from Latin primo (adv.) "first in order of time," from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + genitus, past participle of gignere "to beget" (see genus). Earlier it meant simply "fact of being first-born" (1590s).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRIMOGENITURE

birthright

nounheritage
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.