pontificate

[ noun pon-tif-i-kit, -keyt; verb pon-tif-i-keyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF pontificate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PONTIFICATE

But it was not so with that pontificate on which the Church was built.

He died in 604, after a pontificate of thirteen years and six months.

The Cardinal was an early riser, and was to pontificate at high mass in the Lateran.

Given at Lyons, on the 3rd of July, in the fifth year of our Pontificate.

He died on the 27th day of his pontificate, and was succeeded by Paul V.

Leo was disturbed throughout his pontificate by heresy and schism.

What authority is there for believing it to have been cast in the pontificate of St. Leo?

In the next place he was an upholder of the Maccabean pontificate.

In the pontificate of Nicholas V. it was destroyed by an inundation.

His pontificate, therefore, was an era in the history of the Church.

WORD ORIGIN

1818, "to act as a pontiff," from Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare "to be a pontifex," from Latin pontifex (see pontiff). Meaning "to assume pompous and dignified airs, issue dogmatic decrees" is from 1825. Meaning "to say (something) in a pontifical way" is from 1922. Related: Pontificated; pontificating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PONTIFICATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.