Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLANTS

It is our mission, as the plants and the lower living things have theirs.

There seemed to be much novelty in the plants along its banks.

The question is, How was the land surface formed for the growth of plants?

There was less order in the garden than before, but the plants and shrubs were of her own setting.

Her yard is a varying pageant of plants in all stages of misfortune.

I asked for some shrubs, flowers and plants, which I arranged along the three steps.

If any of the plants are eat by this worm, you must set another one by it.

This mode of reproduction is common to the great majority of plants.

It seems a hard method of ridding the plants of their enemies.

Stakes should be used that when driven will be about two-thirds the height of the plants.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English plante "young tree or shrub, herb newly planted," from Latin planta "sprout, shoot, cutting" (source of Spanish planta, French plante), perhaps from *plantare "to drive in with the feet, push into the ground with the feet," from planta "sole of the foot," from nasalized form of PIE *plat- "to spread, flat" (see place (n.)).

Broader sense of "any vegetable life, vegetation generally" is first recorded 1550s. Most extended usages are from the verb, on the notion of "something planted;" e.g. "construction for an industrial process," 1789, at first with reference to the set-up of machinery, later also the building; also slang meaning "a spy" (1812). Many of these follow similar developments in the French form of the word. German Pflanz, Irish cland, Welsh plant are from Latin.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PLANTS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.