organum

[ awr-guh-nuh m ]SEE DEFINITION OF organum
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ORGANUM

The very word is redolent of an Organum—whether novum or veterum.

The transition from organum to discant was effected about the year 1100.

The Organum (philosophy of first principles) of Aristotle was first publicly taught in 1215.

Organum est librite hydrobapticum ad omnium ripas situm, lingu fervore refrigerando.

The inductive method, so far as exhibited in the Organum, is exemplified by an investigation into the nature of heat.

It has been called by Whewell at once the Encyclopaedia and the Organum of the 13th century.

In the organistrum three strings, acted on simultaneously by the keys, produced the rude harmony known as organum.

He called his system an “organum” or “diaphony,” and to sing according to his rules was called to “organize” or “organate.”

By studying the rules prescribed for the organum, the singers could add the proper intervals to the melody.

The combination of the faux bourdon and the remnant of the organum gives us the foundation for our modern tone system.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ORGANUM

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.