Synonyms for muscles

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Antonyms for muscles

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MUSCLES

If you grow up and have muscles like them, you can call yourself a man.

Under the strain of his muscles, iron bars bent like hot wax.

Her throat was bare, and she saw the muscles of it knotted in the struggle for life.

Lauzanne knew what had come to him of genealogy, not in his mind so much as in his muscles.

You know his drawl, when his muscles give him the respectful hesitation.

They praised his eyes' alertness, the smoothness of his muscles.

She was a wiry woman, a mass of muscles animated by an eager energy.

Taffy was not used to such toil, and his muscles were soon weary.

He relies on his muscles and not on his charms, for support.

Stanley's jaw dropped, but it was surprise which slackened the muscles.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Middle French muscle "muscle, sinew" (14c.) and directly from Latin musculus "a muscle," literally "little mouse," diminutive of mus "mouse" (see mouse (n.)).

So called because the shape and movement of some muscles (notably biceps) were thought to resemble mice. The analogy was made in Greek, too, where mys is both "mouse" and "muscle," and its comb. form gives the medical prefix myo-. Cf. also Old Church Slavonic mysi "mouse," mysica "arm;" German Maus "mouse; muscle," Arabic 'adalah "muscle," 'adal "field mouse." In Middle English, lacerte, from the Latin word for "lizard," also was used as a word for a muscle.

Hence muscular and mousy are relatives, and a Middle English word for "muscular" was lacertous, "lizardy." Figurative sense of "force, violence, threat of violence" is 1930, American English. Muscle car "hot rod" is from 1969.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MUSCLES

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.