mouse

[ noun mous; verb mouz ]SEE DEFINITION OF mouse

Synonyms for mouse

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOUSE

Lockwood continued to watch Duncan with the air of a cat eyeing a mouse.

It is better to be torn to pieces at a spring, than to be a mouse at the caprice of such a cat.'

The mouse gnawed a hole in the chest, and fetched out the ring.

Then the cat carried the mouse to the house in which the chest stood.

That thing had me fooled; I thought at first it was a Russian mouse hound.

Its ear and its paw are like that of a mouse, and it has a very lively eye.

There is another sort, not much bigger than a mouse, and of a bright bay-colour.

Why, the sight of a red coat scares you worse than getting chased by a mouse.

I exclaimed, "Do you think it possible a mouse can be in the piano?"

Position your mouse over the line to see the transliteration.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English mus "small rodent," also "muscle of the arm," from Proto-Germanic *mus (cf. Old Norse, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Danish, Swedish mus, Dutch muis, German Maus "mouse"), from PIE *mus- (cf. Sanskrit mus "mouse, rat," Old Persian mush "mouse," Old Church Slavonic mysu, Latin mus, Lithuanian muse "mouse," Greek mys "mouse, muscle").

Plural form mice (Old English mys) shows effects of i-mutation. Contrasted with man (n.) from 1620s. Meaning "black eye" (or other discolored lump) is from 1842. Computer sense is from 1965, though applied to other things resembling a mouse in shape since 1750, mainly nautical.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOUSE

bruise

nounblack and blue mark under skin
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.