Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOISTNESS

It steals pungently through the blue sparkle of the morning, fading away toward noon when the moistness is dried out.

The insulation of the conductor has been a matter of considerable difficulty, chiefly on account of the moistness of the climate.

It is good against the coldness, moistness of the Brain, and Stomach, and it strengthneth the Vital spirits.

Moist′ness; Moist′ure, moistness: that which makes slightly wet: a small quantity of any liquid.

The rope was tied fast and firm round the pegs, and the moistness of its end showed the length to be sufficient.

The leading essentials in a seed-bed for clover are fineness, cleanness, moistness and firmness.

Fineness, firmness, cleanness and moistness are the chief essentials to be looked for in making the seed-bed.

Her lips and eyes seemed in their moistness to resemble dewy flowers peeping out of a sheltering glade.

The moistness was in her old eyes again, and she had to wipe it away before she could go on stitching.

Something suspiciously akin to moistness dimmed her beautiful eyes before she dropped them and partly turned away her head.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "moist, wet; well-irrigated," from Old French moiste "damp, wet, soaked" (13c., Modern French moite), from Vulgar Latin *muscidus "moldy," also "wet," from Latin mucidus "slimy, moldy, musty," from mucus "slime" (see mucus). Alternative etymology [Diez] is from Latin musteus "fresh, green, new," literally "like new wine," from musteum "new wine" (see must (n.1)). If this wasn't the source, it influenced the form of the other word in Old French. Related: Moistly; moistness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOISTNESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.