minuteness

[ mahy-noot, -nyoot, mi- ]SEE DEFINITION OF minuteness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MINUTENESS

And her care for the old man was beautiful in its minuteness, its vigilance.

I had to describe the little ones with the minuteness of anatomy.

No other thinker has ever dissected the human mind with equal patience and minuteness.

The gravity and minuteness with which some particulars are related also lend an artful aid.

He would be Michelangelesque, and that by sheer force of minuteness.

The greatness and the minuteness of Nature pass all understanding.

It is honourable of the advertiser to mention the minuteness of the cliffs.

Poussin studied nature with a minuteness that often exposed him to raillery.

Columbus observed and reported the customs of these people with some minuteness.

This tendency has been in the direction of minuteness and accuracy of detail.

WORD ORIGIN

"sixtieth part of an hour or degree," late 14c., from Old French minut (13c.) or directly from Medieval Latin minuta "minute, short note," from Latin minuta, noun use of fem. of minutus "small, minute" (see minute (adj.)). In Medieval Latin, pars minuta prima "first small part" was used by mathematician Ptolemy for one-sixtieth of a circle, later of an hour (next in order was secunda minuta, which became second (n.)). German Minute, Dutch minuut also are from French. Used vaguely for "short time" from late 14c. As a measure expressing distance (travel time) by 1886. Minute hand is attested from 1726.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MINUTENESS

smallness

nounlittleness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.