midsummer

[ mid-suhm-er, -suhm- ]SEE DEFINITION OF midsummer
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MIDSUMMER

The passage was a fine one, as we doubled the Horn at midsummer.

The glory of midsummer mid-day upon mountain, lake, and ruin.

The judges had been directed to look again into the matter at the midsummer assizes.

This explained to the jury why in midsummer he wore a frock coat.

This fruit may be kept for several months, if gathered of a middling size at midsummer, and treated in the following manner.

They flower timely, and after Midsummer, are scarcely seene.

Tell us how he was at the Hawk and Heron in London at midsummer.

A pound of water in the ocean-tempest has no more gravity than in a midsummer pond.

Midsummer came, and the shallows were almost choked with weeds.

Although it was midsummer, the roads were heavy and deep with mud.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English midsumor, from mid + sumor "summer" (see summer (n.1)). Midsummer Day, as an English quarter-day, was June 24. Astronomically June 21, but traditionally reckoned in Europe on the night of June 23-24.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MIDSUMMER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.