manure

[ muh-noo r, -nyoo r ]SEE DEFINITION OF manure
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MANURE

Some use tobacco stems as a mulch about Asters instead of manure.

Do not manure the ground for golden or variegated leaved shrubs.

The odor of manure is no doubt pleasant to a farm laborer, but it is unpleasant to us.

Claude had quite a liking for manure, since it symbolises the world and its life.

It is found in well manured gardens and fields, or about manure piles.

This species, as the name suggests, is found on manure or manured grounds.

Growers do not all follow the same method of fermenting or composting the manure.

For who is able to manure an whole Orchard plot, if it be barren?

The soil and manure do not constitute the whole cause of the plants and animals.

Let us, therefore, mercifully leave them to manure their dead roses in peace.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1400, "to cultivate land," also "to hold property," from Anglo-French meynoverer, Old French manouvrer "to work with the hands, cultivate; carry out; make, produce," from Medieval Latin manuoperare (see maneuver (n.)). Sense of "work the earth" led to "put dung on the soil" (1590s) and to the current noun meaning "dung spread as fertilizer," which is first attested 1540s. Until late 18c., however, the verb still was used in a figurative sense of "to cultivate the mind, train the mental powers."

Related: Manured; manuring.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MANURE

bowel movement

nounexpulsion of feces
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.