Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MANNED

They are here from all over the world, these ships, they are manned by men of all nations.

Besides, the works were not manned; cannon, ammunition, men were wanting.

One must be of Coqueville to recognize at that distance the "Baleine" and those who manned her.

That thought has manned me and upheld me when anguish was near to slaying me outright.

The galatea must go on manned by her own people, and the old Indian, who was to act as pilot.

He saw the boat, manned, drop swiftly below the rail, and rushed after her.

The four sides of the stockade had been manned by that time.

Along the whole line of the manned stockade the whisperings had ceased.

Every Wajo fugitive who manned the hulk felt the approach of a decisive moment.

He went himself in that boat, which was manned, of course, by his Malay seamen.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English man, mann "human being, person (male or female); brave man, hero; servant, vassal," from Proto-Germanic *manwaz (cf. Old Saxon, Swedish, Dutch, Old High German man, German Mann, Old Norse maðr, Danish mand, Gothic manna "man"), from PIE root *man- (1) "man" (cf. Sanskrit manuh, Avestan manu-, Old Church Slavonic mozi, Russian muzh "man, male").

Plural men (German Männer) shows effects of i-mutation. Sometimes connected to root *men- "to think" (see mind), which would make the ground sense of man "one who has intelligence," but not all linguists accept this. Liberman, for instance, writes, "Most probably man 'human being' is a secularized divine name" from Mannus [cf. Tacitus, "Germania," chap. 2], "believed to be the progenitor of the human race."

Sense of "adult male" is late (c.1000); Old English used wer and wif to distinguish the sexes, but wer began to disappear late 13c. and was replaced by man. Universal sense of the word remains in mankind and manslaughter. Similarly, Latin had homo "human being" and vir "adult male human being," but they merged in Vulgar Latin, with homo extended to both senses. A like evolution took place in Slavic languages, and in some of them the word has narrowed to mean "husband." PIE had two stems: *uiHro "freeman" (cf. Sanskrit vira-, Lithuanian vyras, Latin vir, Old Irish fer, Gothic wair) and *hner "man," a title more of honor than *uiHro (cf. Sanskrit nar-, Armenian ayr, Welsh ner, Greek aner).

Man also was in Old English as an indefinite pronoun, "one, people, they." The chess pieces so called from c.1400. As an interjection of surprise or emphasis, first recorded c.1400, but especially popular from early 20c. Man-about-town is from 1734; the Man "the boss" is from 1918. To be man or mouse "be brave or be timid" is from 1540s. Men's Liberation first attested 1970.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MANNED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.