manciple

[ man-suh-puh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF manciple
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MANCIPLE

The Manciple is chaffing the ‘coke’ for having had too much to drink.

Manciple, you are responsible for the preservation of that Star-fish.

Manciple, man′si-pl, n. a steward: a purveyor, particularly of a college or an inn of court.

He did as soon as Alice said that about whining and grizzling being below the dignity of a Manciple.

Extra food obtained from the manciple to be eaten in private was called Battels.

One of Chaucer's pilgrims is a manciple of the Temple, of whom he gives a good character for his skill in purveying.

I may add that pulled, in the sense of 'plucked off the feathers,' occurs in the Manciple's Tale; H. 304.

Chaucer repeats the example yet a third time, in the Manciple's Tale, H. 163.

The Canon's Yeoman's tale is the first told on the third day, and the Manciple's is only the second.

The satire was too much for the Cook, who became excited, and fell from his horse in his attempts to oppose the Manciple.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MANCIPLE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.