macaroni

[ mak-uh-roh-nee ]SEE DEFINITION OF macaroni

Synonyms for macaroni

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MACARONI

Proceed in this way, until the dish is full (the top layer must be macaroni).

Serve in a hot dish, with a border of boiled rice or macaroni.

Put a layer of macaroni in the bottom of a greased pie-dish.

Macaroni, rice, and such things are left a prey to mice or insects.

The issues, clear enough to us, seem to him mixed as macaroni.

Well, macaroni, then; and plum-pudding for dessert—and apples.

It is to the American, then, that the beggar looks for his daily macaroni.

The Macaroni Club was to the last century what Crockford's was to this.

Its chief value is as a relish with bread, crackers, potatoes, or macaroni.

She looked at him above her fork, from which the macaroni streamed down.

WORD ORIGIN

"tube-shaped food made of dried wheaten paste" [Klein], 1590s, from southern Italian dialectal maccaroni (Italian maccheroni), plural of maccarone, name for a kind of pasty food, possibly from maccare "bruise, batter, crush," of unknown origin, or from late Greek makaria "food made from barley."

Used after c.1764 to mean "fop, dandy" (e.g. "Yankee Doodle") because it was an exotic dish at a time when certain young men who had traveled the continent were affecting French and Italian fashions and accents. There is said to have been a Macaroni Club in Britain, which was the immediate source of the term.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MACARONI

fop

noundandy
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.