Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LOATH

He was worried and apprehensive, yet the camp lured his mate and she was loath to depart.

Joshua turned and took another step; but Gorman was loath to let him go.

He was only enjoying an interview—a vengeance—he was loath to terminate.

I was loath to leave this historical tin box, but time pressed.

He would be loath to die until he had taught her to regret him.

Loath though she might be to depart, there was no reason she could urge for lingering.

Now that the time had come she was loath to part from her kind companions.

Both felt it; both were loath to acknowledge the feeling by so much as a look.

The man sat 33 up and scratched the back of his head, for he was loath to go.

Bonefishermen are loath to tell anything about their methods.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English lað "hated; hateful; hostile; repulsive," from Proto-Germanic *laithaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian leth "loathsome," Old Norse leiðr "hateful, hostile, loathed;" Middle Dutch lelijc, Dutch leelijk "ugly;" Old High German leid "sorrowful, hateful, offensive, grievous," German Leid "sorrow;" French laid "ugly," from Frankish *laid), from PIE root *leit- "to detest."

Weakened meaning "averse, disinclined" is attested from late 14c. Loath to depart, a line from some long-forgotten song, is recorded since 1580s as a generic term expressive of any tune played at farewells, the sailing of a ship, etc. Related: Loathness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LOATH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.