lichen

[ lahy-kuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF lichen

Synonyms for lichen

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LICHEN

There was no soil, no moss, no lichen, no trace of vegetation.

And no sign of life, save for an occasional patch of lichen on a rock.

These rocks are well tinted 236 with lichen, but they present a barren appearance.

It clings to the mind, when it has once seized on it, like a lichen on the rock.

Dampier, the traveller, used this lichen for the same purpose.

"These 'ere," pointing to some very pretty moss and lichen brackets.

The lichen comes from the Canary Islands, and also from Sweden.

The lichen dried and pulverized is to be exhausted by boiling alcohol.

Is there one of them with its lichen–mantle copied from its neighbours?

Its sulphurous yellow colour is due to the lichen with which it is covered.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1600, from Latin lichen, from Greek leichen, originally "what eats around itself," probably from leichein "to lick" (see lick). Originally used of liverwort; the modern sense first recorded 1715. Related: Lichenaceous.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LICHEN

moss

nounflowerless plant
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.