introvert

[ noun, adjective in-truh-vurt; verb in-truh-vurt ]SEE DEFINITION OF introvert

Synonyms for introvert

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Antonyms for introvert

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INTROVERT

The mind becomes full of sex: and always, in an introvert, of his own sex.

The Major Maintainer hadn't merely been switched to Introvert.

I would say that Lee's character was that he was more of a listener than a talker, not to the extent of being an introvert.

The introvert is the typical contemplative, predominantly interested in the inner world.

The introvert's natural adaptation is by means of thought; feeling being more or less repressed remains undeveloped.

The introvert regards everything from the aspect of his own personality; the extrovert is dependent upon the value of his object.

An Extrovert can hardly conceive the necessity which compels the Introvert to conquer the world by means of a system.

With the introvert the expression of feelings is really a gesture that is artificially adopted and conventional.

They lack anything individual and original, and are just as lukewarm and colourless as the conventional feelings of the introvert.

The introvert is characterised by the thought standpoint; the extrovert by the feeling standpoint.

WORD ORIGIN

1650s, from Latin intro- "inward" (see intro-) + vertere "to turn" (see versus). The noun, "introverted person" (opposed to extrovert) is 1918, from German psychology, introduced there by C.G. Jung (1875-1961).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INTROVERT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.