humanness

[ hyoo-muh n or, often, yoo‐ ]SEE DEFINITION OF humanness

Synonyms for humanness

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HUMANNESS

It is the scene that brings the humanness of the great tragedy most closely home to us.

He was too wildly incomprehensible with his changes from humanness to folly.

Time must be devoted to knowing and experiencing our humanness.

There is certainly depth and mystery; but there is humanness and tenderness as well.

The rarest thing in the world, I find, is the quality of humanness.

They are peculiarly of my mind, my humanness, and they are useful therein.

But the lyric poetry is the true luminous and bloody interpreting of humanness.

And a fascination in it tempers my humanness with an evil-feeling power.

He is distinctly and excessively male, at the expense of his humanness.

He was inclined to like her better for what he would have called her humanness.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., humain, humaigne, from Old French humain, umain (adj.) "of or belonging to man" (12c.), from Latin humanus "of man, human," also "humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized," probably related to homo (genitive hominis) "man" (see homunculus) and to humus "earth," on notion of "earthly beings," as opposed to the gods (cf. Hebrew adam "man," from adamah "ground"). Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) "man, male person."

As a noun, from 1530s. Its Old English cognate guma (from Proto-Germanic *guman-) survives only in disguise in bridegroom. Related: Humanness. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and drawn from natural resources.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HUMANNESS

humanity

nounhuman race
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.