hoisted

[ hoist or, sometimes, hahyst ]SEE DEFINITION OF hoisted
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HOISTED

We have just hoisted the nun-lady on board an English packet.

Then he hoisted the tree on to the wain, roped it into place, and told the cartman to drive on.

Yorke would get hoisted over me, and I should be laughed at for a duffer.

The English flag was lowered, and that of the French hoisted.

They presently captured the fort and hoisted the German flag.

He grabbed the groveling butcher and hoisted him from his wallow.

She hoisted the infant on to her own shoulder with her right arm.

It was too much for flesh and blood; a white flag was hoisted.

He hoisted it every fine morning and he took it in every night.

Thus I hoisted myself, and presently I threw an arm over the parapet.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "to raise," earlier hoise (c.1500), probably originally past tense of Middle English hysse (late 15c.), which is probably from Middle Dutch hyssen (Dutch hijsen) "to hoist," related to Low German hissen and Old Norse hissa upp "raise." A nautical word found in most European languages (e.g. French hisser, Italian issare, Spanish izar), but it is uncertain which had it first. Related: Hoisted; hoisting. In phrase hoist with one's own petard, it is the past participle.

Meaning "to lift and remove" was prevalent c.1550-1750. As a noun, 1650s, from the verb.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HOISTED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.