Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GYPSY

Gypsy showed signs of melting, whinnying softly and forgivingly.

Gypsy would have nothing to do with her, and sniffed the air with offended dignity.

"Sit where you are, girl," commanded the gypsy in sepulchral tones.

Pansy and Pickwick, and the birds and Gypsy, and Methusaleh are all good friends.

In English gypsy, the same words are expressed by Rom, romni, and romnipen.

I class it with the gypsy, because all who speak it are also acquainted with Romany.

It is not mine by right,” said the generous Italian; “it belongs to the gypsy.

As for morality in gypsy girls, their principles are very peculiar.

And I was moved to like them, and nobody perceives this sooner than a gypsy.

I am assured on good authority that a gypsy had a child baptized by this name.

WORD ORIGIN

also gipsy, c.1600, alteration of gypcian, a worn-down Middle English dialectal form of egypcien "Egyptian," from the supposed origin of these people. As an adjective, from 1620s.

Cognate with Spanish Gitano and close in sense to Turkish and Arabic Kipti "gypsy," literally "Coptic;" but in Middle French they were Bohémien (see bohemian), and in Spanish also Flamenco "from Flanders." "The gipsies seem doomed to be associated with countries with which they have nothing to do" [Weekley]. Zingari, the Italian and German name, is of unknown origin. Romany is from the people's own language, a plural adjective form of rom "man." Gipsy is the prefered spelling in England.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GYPSY

bohemian

nounnonconformist
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.