graveness

[ greyv; for 4, 6 also grahv ]SEE DEFINITION OF graveness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GRAVENESS

Because of the graveness of their situation, love had to stand aside.

Stuart said with a graveness that rebuked her flippancy: Do you love him so little as to remain always apart?

The commencement of the master's speech and the graveness of his tone sent a serious thrill through the hearts of the boys.

It is not a time to falter before the graveness of our responsibility and the magnitude of our undertakings.

The graveness of the situation now dawned upon her mind with a terrible force—Hualcoyotl had chosen her to be his queen.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English græf "grave, ditch, cave," from Proto-Germanic *graban (cf. Old Saxon graf, Old Frisian gref, Old High German grab "grave, tomb;" Old Norse gröf "cave," Gothic graba "ditch"), from PIE root *ghrebh- "to dig, to scratch, to scrape" (cf. Old Church Slavonic grobu "grave, tomb"); related to grafan "to dig" (see grave (v.)).

From Middle Ages to 17c., they were temporary, crudely marked repositories from which the bones were removed to ossuaries after some years and the grave used for a fresh burial. "Perpetual graves" became common from c.1650. To make (someone) turn in his grave "behave in some way that would have offended the dead person" is first recorded 1888.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GRAVENESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.