fulsomely

[ foo l-suh m, fuhl- ]SEE DEFINITION OF fulsomely
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FULSOMELY

"He was to ha' Janet on condeetion that he made the eldership," he fulsomely explained.

The theory of evolution is being patronised by Theists rather too fulsomely.

Without an exception the various biographies were fulsomely laudatory.

He playes with his case as a cat would with a mouse, and be so fulsomely pedantique that a school boy would nauseate it.

That fatuous revenue officer, Lomax (Mr. Malleson), has written a fulsomely flattering life of him at which his gorge rises.

They are fulsomely polite, but it is just that lip-service which sets the Englishman's back up.

The Solicitor-General (Bacon), in his speech, took the opportunity of fulsomely bepraising the king after his manner.

Mr. Schwirtz introduced Una to the others so fulsomely that she was immediately taken into the inner political ring.

Gus got up, holding a sapient member of a sapient race who was hanging onto his beard, and thanked Ernst Mallin fulsomely.

Marie's creme proved a great success, and the others congratulated her on it so fulsomely that they made her blush.

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English compound of ful "full" (see full (adj.)) + -som (see -some (1)). Sense evolved from "abundant, full" (mid-13c.) to "plump, well-fed" (mid-14c.) to "overgrown, overfed" (1640s) and thus, of language, "offensive to taste or good manners" (1660s). Since the 1960s, however, it commonly has been used in its original, favorable sense, especially in fulsome praise. Related: Fulsomely; fulsomeness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FULSOMELY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.