Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FUDGE

Clayton knew it very well, and the trick of examining the books was all a fudge.

“Oh, fudge on the judges,” Langford exclaimed in affected disgust.

There was to be fudge, too, which Nancy had the knack of making.

I don't call this fudge; what I mean by fudge is, outside without inside.

So we stopped at the store, and she's loaded me down with stuff for fudge.

Strikes me wot is called the Law is often fuss, and fraud, and fudge!

After the business is over, we are going 112to have a fudge party.

I have known a Quarterly Review non-plussed by the word "Fudge!"

Then he whispered something to Jimmy, who said, "Aw, fudge!"

No; Fudge is candy—the most delicious adorable stuff you ever tasted.

WORD ORIGIN

"put together clumsily or dishonestly," 1610s, perhaps an alteration of fadge "make suit, fit" (1570s), of unknown origin. As an interjection meaning "lies, nonsense" from 1766; the noun meaning "nonsense" is 1791. It could be a natural extension from the verb. But Farmer suggests provincial French fuche, feuche, "an exclamation of contempt from Low German futsch = begone."

The traditional English story traces fudge in this sense to a sailor's retort to anything considered lies or nonsense, from Captain Fudge, "who always brought home his owners a good cargo of lies" [Isaac Disraeli, 1791, citing a pamphlet from 1700]. It seems there really was a late 17c. Captain Fudge, called "Lying Fudge," and perhaps his name reinforced this form of fadge in the sense of "contrive without the necessary materials." The surname is from Fuche, a pet form of the masc. proper name Fulcher, from Germanic and meaning literally "people-army."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FUDGE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.