Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FEY

I think I must be fey to-day; you cannot irritate me even when you try.

I'm 'fey' to-day, as the Scotch say, and must 'dree my weird'.

"You're 'fey,' child," she said, as she helped her out of the dandy.

Into his mind, involuntarily, came the awesome Scotch word “fey.”

"The man is fey," said the Duke to himself, listening with a startled gravity.

Blue is the colour of youth, and all the blue flowers have a "fey" look.

Isbel Beattie was "fey," they said, and would take no advice.

As for Jessie, the Scotch servant, she shook her head, and said the master was fey.

"Surely the master is fey," whispered Gwenoch in fear to the chaplain.

Telford stared at me, and muttered, 'The lad's fey, as they used to say in the North.'

WORD ORIGIN

"of excitement that presages death," from Old English fæge "doomed to die, fated, destines," also "timid, feeble;" and/or from Old Norse feigr, both from Proto-Germanic *faigjo- (cf. Old Saxon fegi, Old Frisian fai, Middle Dutch vege, Middle High German veige "doomed," also "timid," German feige "cowardly"), from PIE *peig- "evil-minded, hostile" (see foe). Preserved in Scottish. Sense of "displaying unearthly qualities" and "disordered in the mind (like one about to die)" led to modern ironic sense of "affected."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FEY

clairvoyant

adjectiveintuitive, psychic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.