Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EYING

"Hullo," he growled, stopping short and eying him malevolently with lowered head.

“You say that that is and must be wrong under all circumstances,” said Eugen, eying me steadily.

He could not have understood her, for he drew back a pace or two, eying her with apprehension.

"That might be, of course," Mason allowed, eying the girl critically.

"Yes, and a wonderful resemblance," said Upton, eying it through his glass.

Smith was eying the bantam critically when Dicksie rejoined him.

“Stand away from me,” hammered de Spain, eying Morgan steadily.

"That ought to fetch them," she said, eying the baited line with an air of satisfaction.

At this moment he was eying the window-pane with intelligent intentness.

Eying her a moment, he bit it off, and put the rest in her hand with a grim smile.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, from Old English ege (Mercian), eage (West Saxon), from Proto-Germanic *augon (cf. Old Saxon aga, Old Frisian age, Old Norse auga, Swedish öga, Danish øie, Middle Dutch oghe, Dutch oog, Old High German ouga, German Auge, Gothic augo "eye"), from PIE *okw- "to see" (cf. Sanskrit akshi "the eye, the number two," Greek opsis "a sight," Old Church Slavonic oko, Lithuanian akis, Latin oculus, Greek okkos, Tocharian ak, ek, Armenian akn).

Until late 14c. the plural was in -an, hence modern dialectal plural een, ene. The eye of a needle was in Old English; to see eye to eye is from Isa. lii:8. Eye contact attested by 1965. Eye-opener "anything that informs and enlightens" is from 1863. Have an eye on "keep under supervision" is attested from early 15c.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.