emaciation

[ ih-mey-shee-ey-shuh n, -see- ]SEE DEFINITION OF emaciation
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EMACIATION

Poverty, emaciation, and a semi-barbarism deformed the whole kingdom.

Propped up with pillows, he looked at me with the big eyes of his emaciation.

Refugees who had hidden in the woods came to the camps in rags and emaciation.

Not the thinness of emaciation, but that of bodily structure.

On such occasions, he issues forth in a state of extreme weakness and emaciation.

Dyspepsia and general debility and emaciation accompanied the disease.

All this, however, was as nothing compared with the gauntness and emaciation of the man.

His face was growing thin, almost to emaciation, and his hands were transparent.

They were in a more wretched state of filth and emaciation than their predecessors.

Always slender, he was shadowy now, worn and thin to emaciation.

WORD ORIGIN

1660s, from Latin emaciationem, noun of state from past participle stem of emaciare (see emaciate), or perhaps a native formation from emaciate.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EMACIATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.