digression

[ dih-gresh-uhn, dahy- ]SEE DEFINITION OF digression
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DIGRESSION

This, however, was not in a shy neighbourhood, and is a digression consequently.

This is a digression from the main point, and yet it brings me to what I was going to say.'

But, to return again from this digression to the subject of sheep and wool.

Do not let us abuse the freedom of digression which we claim.

The other digression is the famous contrast of the lawyer and philosopher.

I return to the point reached when this digression into the affairs of Jason began.

I return to the point reached at the commencement of this digression.

This statement is enriched by a digression upon the meaning of the soul.

And now to the dinner, which, in our digression, we are forgetting.

And how and wherefore have we wandered off in this digression!

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Latin digressionem (nominative digressio) "a going away, departing," noun of action from past participle stem of digredi "to deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" (see dis-) + gradi "to step, go" (see grade (n.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DIGRESSION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.