cul-de-sac

[ kuhl-duh-sak, -sak, koo l-; French kyduh-sak ]SEE DEFINITION OF cul-de-sac

Synonyms for cul-de-sac

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CUL-DE-SAC

She knew of situations like that, the cul-de-sac of chastity, worse than any devised by a Javert.

It is a labyrinth of winding alley often ending in a cul-de-sac.

Suppose this one that she had chosen at random terminated in a cul-de-sac?

It was only at rare times that he ran his head into a cul-de-sac.

Well, my mind has been wandering and stumbled on a cul-de-sac as usual.

Stratton Street, a cul-de-sac, was built about 1693 by Lady Stratton.

And yet, lawyers like Hodgson & Fair are not likely to be led into a cul-de-sac.

We seemed to have arrived at a cul-de-sac, when a bright idea struck me.

He feared that he would either be shot or left to starve in this cul-de-sac in the hills.

It was not the kind of cul-de-sac that Goritz would have chosen.

WORD ORIGIN

1738, as an anatomical term, from French cul-de-sac, literally "bottom of a sack," from Latin culus "bottom" (for second element, see sack (n.1)). Application to streets and alleys is from 1800.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CUL-DE-SAC

blind alley

nounclosed-off passage
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.