consanguine

[ kon-sang-gwin-ee-uh s ]SEE DEFINITION OF consanguine
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONSANGUINE

The first is the consanguine group of first cousins and nearer.

It is evident that the punaluan family was formed out of the consanguine.

Next, how did the Consanguine family change into the Punaluan?

Consanguine, kon-sang′gwin, adj. related by blood: of the same family or descent—also Consanguin′eous.

Cunow does not see in the consanguine family the most primitive of all social forms, until now discovered.

The husbands of these women are not of the consanguine group, the gens, of their wives; they are of the gens of their sisters.

Women were already deposed from their former exalted position as heads of families and as leaders of consanguine communities.

The consanguine family also prevailed at the time of Herodotus among the Massagetes.

In this or a similar manner that form which Morgan styles the Punaluan family developed from the consanguine family.

They inherited first together with the other consanguine relatives of the mother, later on perhaps in preference to the others.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1600, from French consanguin (14c.), from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood" (see consanguinity).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONSANGUINE

ancestral

adjectiverelated to previous family or family trait
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.