connotative

[ kon-uh-tey-tiv, kuh-noh-tuh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF connotative

Synonyms for connotative

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Proper names, on the other hand, though concrete, are not connotative.

This is still more the case in propositions with connotative subjects.

The collective name is then "connotative" of the common characters of the collection.

Known sometimes as the Connotative or the Denotative-Connotative view.

It has been seen that all concrete general names are connotative.

It is otherwise when objects are spoken of by connotative names.

The names of feelings, like other concrete general names, are connotative: but they connote a mere resemblance.

The more real the emotion the more compact and connotative, usually, is its expression.

Most terms (the exceptions and doubtful cases will be discussed hereafter) have two functions, a denotative and a connotative.

A connotative term is one which denotes a subject, and implies an attribute.

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.