conjuror

[ kon-jer-er, kuhn- for 1, 2; kuh n-joo r-er for 3 ]SEE DEFINITION OF conjuror
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONJUROR

Not he—he's no conjuror: many's the dozen tricks I played him afore now.

He was the only conjuror, the real one, a worthy descendant of the magicians of old.

At Ems I shall not be a conjuror: but I never part with my box.

At those words, the scene changed as if by the wand of a conjuror.

But still, Riccabocca was said to be a Papist, and suspected to be a conjuror.

We will make them vanish,” broke in the minister, “like half-pence in the hands of a conjuror.

She had held it concealed in her palm, and produced it like a conjuror.

She wants to speak to the Conjuror, with whom she is left alone.

Morris turns furiously to the Conjuror, accusing him of trickery.

Can anyone imagine an Indian conjuror dreaming of a new trick?

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Anglo-French conjurour, Old French conjureur "conjurer, magician, exorcist," from Latin coniurator, from coniurare (see conjure).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.