Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COHORTS

The rattled farmer and his cohorts were bluffed and puzzled.

They learned that the three men were Sol Blugg and his cohorts.

D'Annunzio and his cohorts refused to have anything to do with the Cabinet.

Ten or twelve cohorts of the Prætorians and a handful of horse.

The cohorts of abolition are the Zouaves of the Republican camp.

The schools of the Palatine were the station of the cohorts of the guard.

In vain did the cohorts of Boxer Hall implore them to brace.

The fatally faulty psychology of the Hun and cohorts misled him as usual.

Send me a hundred cohorts to my country-house; a mole-hill has been discovered there!

Nobody had known about the glass but the bully and even his cohorts were surprised.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "company of soldiers," from Middle French cohorte (14c.) and directly from Latin cohortem (nominative cohors) "enclosure," meaning extended to "infantry company" in Roman army (a tenth part of a legion) through notion of "enclosed group, retinue," from com- "with" (see co-) + root akin to hortus "garden," from PIE *ghr-ti-, from root *gher- "to grasp, enclose" (see yard (n.1)). Sense of "accomplice" is first recorded 1952, American English, from meaning "group united in common cause" (1719).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.