Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CAB

He took a cab and was driven to the local branch of his favourite temple of chance.

He called a cab for the old man, and saw him started safely off up-town.

Her eyes gleamed in the shadow of the cab straight ahead, immovable.

The cab rattled, jingled, jolted; in fact, the last was quite extraordinary.

He glanced again at the cab and groaned: "O Lord, I just dassent!"

And in the course of a few more minutes the cab stopped definitely.

The other cab was pelting after him with all the enthusiasm of a hound on a fresh trail.

Kirkwood looked back, craning his neck round the side of the cab.

A cab clattered down the side street on which the window opened.

I left your daughter in the cab—and by the way, I hadn't paid the driver.

WORD ORIGIN

1826, "light, horse-drawn carriage," shortening of cabriolet (1763), from French cabriolet (18c.), diminutive of cabrioler "leap, caper" (16c./17c.), from Italian capriolare "jump in the air," from capriola, properly "the leap of a kid," from Latin capreolus "wild goat, roebuck," from PIE *kap-ro- "he-goat, buck" (cf. Old Irish gabor, Welsh gafr, Old English hæfr, Old Norse hafr "he-goat"). The carriages had springy suspensions.

Extended to hansoms and other types of carriages, then extended to similar-looking parts of locomotives (1851). Applied especially to public horse carriages, then to automobiles-for-hire (1899) when these began to replace them.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CAB

airplane

nounvehicle that transports cargo or passengers through the air
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.