Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIRCHING

They have not as much as had a birching; and I say that the college masters ought to be hooted.

Those were the good old days of birching, and yes, Mr. Morris had caught it.

The birching, bad as it had been, was redoubled in intensity.

Also, see that you yourself don't go into the storeroom, or I will give you a birching that you won't care for.

You may not believe it, but the governor actually horsed me and gave me a birching; and the diamonds were locked up from that day.

Horse′woman, a woman who rides on horseback; Hors′iness; Hors′ing, birching a schoolboy mounted on another's back.

The Chief was too utterly fed up to do anything; moreover, he saw that a birching would do Gordon no good.

And having occasion to go through Birching Lane, and being asked by the salesmen, "Countrymen, what lack you?"

WORD ORIGIN

Old English berc, beorc (also the name of the rune for "b"), from Proto-Germanic *berkjon (cf. Old Saxon birka, Old Norse börk, Danish birk, Swedish björk, Middle Dutch berke, Dutch berk, Old High German birihha, German Birke), from PIE *bhergo (cf. Ossetian barz, Old Church Slavonic breza, Russian bereza, Lithuanian beržas, Sanskrit bhurjah, Latin farnus, fraxinus "mountain ash"), from root *bhereg- "to gleam, white." Meaning "bunch of birch twigs used for flogging" (1640s) led to verb meaning "to flog" (1830). Related: Birched; birching. Birch beer is by 1827, American English.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.