baboon

[ ba-boon or, esp. British, buh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF baboon

Synonyms for baboon

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BABOON

"Go to the devil, and take your baboon with you," cursed the new arrival.

She was nourished on baboon milk, and the baboon nature is in her veins.

Occasionally a man would slip, or be pulled over in the grip of a baboon.

The mandrills are another species of baboon who inhabit this region.

When the baboon sat down on his hams he was about as tall as the boy when he walked.

Because he came from South Africa and looked like a baboon, we called him "Baboon."

He showed his great teeth and grinned and growled, as a baboon in a rage is apt to do.

The baboon took the former but neglected the latter altogether.

“I was sorry about that baboon,” Pant went on after a moment.

For all his physical appearance, he might have been a baboon dressed like an Eskimo.

WORD ORIGIN

type of ape, c.1400, babewyn, earlier "a grotesque figure used in architecture or decoration" (early 14c.), from French babouin "baboon," from Old French baboin "ape," earlier "simpleton, dimwit, fool" (13c.), also "gaping figure (such as a gargoyle)," so perhaps from Old French baboue "grimacing;" or perhaps it is imitative of the ape's babbling speech-like cries. Also cf. -oon. German Pavian "baboon" is from Dutch baviaan, from Middle Dutch baubijn, a borrowing of the Old French word.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BABOON

monkey

nounprimate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.