articulately

[ adjective, noun ahr-tik-yuh-lit; verb ahr-tik-yuh-leyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF articulately
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ARTICULATELY

At least it's not sharply, not articulately conscious of them.

Thomas, however, handed her the toast, and she then articulately said—“Thank you.”

This question was not articulately answered, but the reply was satisfactory.

Only you did not mean quite what you said so too articulately, and you will unsay it, if you please, and unthink it near the elms.

The pragmatist, on the contrary, articulately defines their meaning.

The Greeks first articulately conceived and deliberately pursued the ideal of Freedom.

He knew that simply she forced herself to re-live this most painful part of her own life and to re-live it articulately.

Some of the tests we meet by actions that are easy, and some of the questions we answer in articulately formulated words.

There are mysterious choruses—sibilant and articulately vocalized—and a final fugue.

It has always been immanent in human thought even when not articulately expressed in human language.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, "to divide speech into distinct parts" (earlier "to formally bring charges against," 1550s), from Latin articulatus, past participle of articulare "to separate into joints," also "to utter distinctly," from articulus "joint" (see article). Generalized sense of "express in words" is from 1690s. Literal sense, "to join, to attach by joints," is attested from 1610s. Earlier senses, "to set forth in articles," "to bring a charge against" (1560s) now are obsolete or nearly so. Related: Articulated; articulating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ARTICULATELY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.