Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ADJECTIVE

It is not the adjective, but the substantive, which is of real importance.

I was raked in by that adjective fool with the unwashed face.

He boggled slightly as he came to the "adjective," but got over it safely.

"Striking" was perhaps the one adjective which would best describe her.

The participle may also have the character of an adjective, the adverb either of an adjective or of a preposition.

An adjective is like an infant in leading strings—it cannot go alone.

Observe how close the concord is between substantive and adjective.

He feels like Napoleon, "that impossible is the adjective of fools."

At least, it was probably as near to deserving that adjective as at any time before or since.

As an adjective, it embraces the idea of supernatural as well as remedial.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., as an adjective, "adjectival," in noun adjective, from Old French adjectif (14c.), from Latin adjectivum "that is added to (the noun)," neuter of adjectivus "added," from past participle of adicere "to throw or place (a thing) near," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + comb. form of iacere "to throw" (see jet (v.)). Also as a noun from late 14c. (adjectives not clearly distinguished from nouns in Middle English). In 19c. Britain, the word itself often was a euphemism for the taboo adjective bloody.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ADJECTIVE

modifier

nounlimiter
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.