Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR YULES

There was always the glory of intimacy in Yules knowing what he thought.

Im obliged of course to grant you that your genuine Yules a Tory of Tories.

By the way, I may as well tell you that I broke short off with the Yules on purpose.'

But I should like to see these Yules at home; I must fish for an invitation.'

Yules edition of Marco Polo has also been a very inspiring source of material.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English geol, geola "Christmas Day, Christmastide," from Old Norse jol (plural), a heathen feast, later taken over by Christianity, of unknown origin.

The Old English (Anglian) cognate giuli was the Anglo-Saxons' name for a two-month midwinter season corresponding to Roman December and January, a time of important feasts but not itself a festival. After conversion to Christianity it narrowed to mean "the 12-day feast of the Nativity" (which began Dec. 25), but was replaced by Christmas by 11c., except in the northeast (areas of Danish settlement), where it remained the usual word.

Revived 19c. by writers to mean "the Christmas of 'Merrie England.' " First direct reference to the Yule log is 17c. Old Norse jol seems to have been borrowed in Old French as jolif, hence Modern French joli "pretty, nice," originally "festive" (see jolly).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.