Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WONDER

The birds feel it—and wonder at the tune that makes no noise.

"If you still love Paralus, I wonder you can be so quiet and cheerful," said Eudora.

"I wonder what the old man will say when he sees me," he soliloquized.

Where is he, I wonder, and how long have I got to wait for him?

I wonder what Will Paine will say when he sees the good care you take of it.

No wonder Florence has a hard time of it; but isn't it wretched of me to gossip?

I wonder how it would seem to live on such an island as this?

To the end of the lives of the spectators, it was a tale of wonder.

But he could not help looking back to wonder at the surprising likeness.

I wonder whether I shall ever be rich enough to live like this!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wundor "marvelous thing, marvel, the object of astonishment," from Proto-Germanic *wundran (cf. Old Saxon wundar, Middle Dutch, Dutch wonder, Old High German wuntar, German wunder, Old Norse undr), of unknown origin. In Middle English it also came to mean the emotion associated with such a sight (late 13c.). The verb is from Old English wundrian. Used colloquially in Pennsylvania German areas in some transitive senses (It wonders me that ... for "I wonder why ..."); this was common in Middle English and as late as Tindale (1533), and a correspondent reports the usage also yet survives in Yorkshire/Lincolnshire. Related: Wondered, wondering, wonders.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WONDER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.