Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WHIPPER

When Whipper resumed his place at his desk, the introduction of bills began.

Smalls and Whipper had been delegates in the 1868 convention.

It is the whipper who is whipped and the tyrant who is undone.

Just then the book-keeper, Tom, handed a memo to Whipper and he turned to me.

"That's Whipper," he explained with a smile, when the gentleman was out of earshot.

Mr. Whipper says of him, that he is "a Napoleon in character."

Mr. Robertson's time here expired, but on motion of Whipper he was allowed fifteen minutes longer.

The firm of Smith and Whipper (lumber merchants), was likewise well-known throughout a wide range of country.

Wright kept such a poor record that Judge Whipper was ashamed to have them expose', an' that's why he didn't give up the books.

I probably looked as disappointed as I felt, for Whipper's voice took on a very sympathetic tone.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from whip (v.). In parliamentary use from 1850 (the verb in this sense is recorded from 1742), from the sense in fox-hunting. The parliamentary whip's duty originally was to ensure the attendance of party members on important occasions.