EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WAIL

Linda looked at her as she buried her face and began to wail.

She was too terrified to add her weeping to the wail of the wind—it would have been too ghastly.

It's the wail of a lost spirit, loosed temporarily from the horrors of purgatory.

The voice changed into what was almost a wail of indignation.

No shriek, no wail, no word succeeded—all was as silent as the grave.

But little Marian, taken with the new acquaintance, broke into a wail.

And sobbing sweethearts, in a row, wail o'er the ocean foam.

He gurgled, stammered, and then broke into a wail of distress.

Louder the voice came, and now in its wail was a note of hysteria.

But women can wail at heart and show a fair face to the world.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old Norse væla "to lament," from "woe" (see woe). Of jazz musicians, "to play very well," attested from 1955, American English slang (wailing "excellent" is attested from 1954). Related: Wailed.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WAIL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.