Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TWINNING

Like labradorite it usually exhibits on the surface of easiest cleavage parallel striations due to twinning structure.

But by far the most important kind of regular conjunction of crystals is that known as “twinning.”

This twinning may be produced by pressure acting either during the crystallization of the rock or at a later period.

In families where twinning is frequent, bodily deformities likewise occur with frequency.

The plate of material is rather wider than before, and is formed into two combs simultaneously, by the aid of a twinning machine.

The second method, known as “twinning” or “parting,” avoids this loss and is also more rapid.

It is of some interest on account of the twinning and the beautiful development of its crystals.

A twinning line, if an intersection edge, should be solid; if not an intersection edge it should be broken into dashes.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English twinn "consisting of two, twofold, double," probably ultimately from Proto-Germanic *twinjaz (cf. Old Norse tvinnr, Old Danish tvinling, Dutch tweeling, German zwillung), from PIE *dwisno- (cf. Latin bini "two each," Lithuanian dvynu "twins"), from *dwi- "double," from root *dwo- "two" (see two). The verb meaning "to combine two things closely" is recorded from late 14c. The noun developed from Old English getwinn "double."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.