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tremble

[ trem-buhl ]SEE DEFINITION OF tremble

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TREMBLE

If they tremble down the fine-skinned cheek, let us avert our gaze.

Humans are funniest when they weep and tremble before, like you say, 'the facts in the case.'

Just then, up came my father, with a sternness in his looks that made me tremble.

It squeaked under his weight, he felt the rungs bow and tremble.

There are ghosts whom I tremble to meet, and cannot think of without a shudder.

In a little while he was relieved, her eyelids began to tremble.

"I came to take him away," said Amy, who had begun to tremble from head to foot.

Had it not been for you, I tremble to think of what might have come of it.

A loud noise which reverberated under the arches made her tremble.

She looked white and scared, and he could feel her hands chill and tremble.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "shake from fear, cold, etc.," from Old French trembler "tremble, fear" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *tremulare (source of Italian tremolare, Spanish temblar), from Latin tremulus "trembling, tremulous," from tremere "to tremble, shiver, quake," from PIE *trem- "to tremble" (cf. Greek tremein "to shiver, tremble," Lithuanian trimu "to chase away," Old Church Slavonic treso "to shake," Gothic þramstei "grasshopper"). A native word for this was Old English bifian. Related: Trembled; trembling. The noun is recorded from c.1600.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TREMBLE

waving

verbmove back and forth; gesture
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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