thunder

[ thuhn-der ]SEE DEFINITION OF thunder

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THUNDER

And a rumble quickly grew to an earth-shaking blast of thunder.

Pound, pound, pound, the hard road rang with the thunder of hoofs.

When he flaps his wings or even moves a quill the thunder peals.

There was no thunder nor lightning during the whole time they were in these latitudes.

And the thunder of galloping hoofs was more menacing than that of the cannon.

The thunder was not loud, but it kept up a continuous muttering and rumbling.

Yet his head, too, was bent in deep sleep, as if only thunder could wake him.

The thunder and lightning had long ago passed over, but the rain was furious.

Though not exactly to my taste, still, by the Thunder and the Lightning!

There was a rumble of thunder far out on the western prairie.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English þunor, from Proto-Germanic *thunraz (cf. Old Norse þorr, Old Frisian thuner, Middle Dutch donre, Dutch donder, Old High German donar, German Donner "thunder"), from PIE *(s)tene- "to resound, thunder" (cf. Sanskrit tanayitnuh "thundering," Persian tundar "thunder," Latin tonare "to thunder"). Swedish tordön is literally "Thor's din." The intrusive -d- is also found in Dutch and Icelandic versions of the word.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR THUNDER

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