threnody

[ thren-uh-dee ]SEE DEFINITION OF threnody

Synonyms for threnody

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THRENODY

I never hated any piece of music as I came to hate that threnody of treason.

In Maeterlinck's mimings there is something of the spirit of Walt Whitman's threnody.

The most famous as well as the most powerful and original of Bion's poems remaining to us is the threnody upon Adonis.

From below a new sound had been added to the threnody of the hills; a new note, grumbling and roaring, insistent and strong.

The subject of the threnody is a nymph of the name of Dido, whose identity can only be vaguely conjectured.

Yet the single poem 'Threnody' would establish Emerson's title to a place among the guild of poets.

But the ode, in a more or less irregular form, whether pan or threnody, has been the instrument of several of our leading lyrists.

The Threnody, written after the death of a deeply loved child, is a beautiful and impressive lament.

The Finale is a threnody, one of overpowering grief, the motto of which might be "vanity of vanities, all is vanity."

The beautiful "Threnody" on the death of his boy, reveals the sorrow of a soaring mind rather than the grief of a crushed heart.

WORD ORIGIN

"song of lamentation," 1630s, from Greek threnodia, from threnos "dirge, lament" + oide "ode" (see ode). Greek threnos probably is from a PIE imitative root meaning "to murmur, hum;" cf. Old English dran "drone," Gothic drunjus "sound," Greek tenthrene "a kind of wasp."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR THRENODY

dirge

nounsad song
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.