take flight

[ flahyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF take flight

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAKE FLIGHT

Happiness had passed me by, it was about to take flight; I caught it in a trap—I lied.

I could not take flight by water, as he could easily overtake me.

Carlino scarcely glanced at her, and suffered her to take flight.

Unless perched on some rocky pinnacle, it is unable to take flight.

I feared even then, that on seeing me she might take flight: and I was too faint to follow her.

Grant allowed his eyes to close so his soul could take flight with the music.

It was not a foot from his back as he crawled under, and it did not take flight.

All that you have demanded of me I have done, but I refuse to take flight like a coward.

When they are alarmed and take flight they utter a single sharp shriek.

They are very wary and will all take flight at the first alarm.

WORD ORIGIN

"act of flying," Old English flyht "a flying, flight," from Proto-Germanic *flukhtiz (cf. Dutch vlucht "flight of birds," Old Norse flugr, Old High German flug, German Flug "flight"), from root of *fleugan "to fly" (see fly (v.1)).

Spelling altered late 14c. from Middle English fliht (see fight (v.)). Meaning "an instance of flight" is 1785, originally of ballooning. Meaning "series of stairs between landings" is from 1703.

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